SuperHealth Challenge Tip!

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Posted on 12th March 2012 by admin in Super Health

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Most of the carbohydrates we eat in “natural foods” are made up of a combination of sugars, including glucose and fructose. As I’ve stated, when glucose enters the bloodstream, the body increases its production of insulin to help regulate the sugar in the blood so it can be taken to cells and used for energy. This infusion of sugar also increases the production of the hormone leptin (as discussed earlier), which regulates the body’s appetite and fat storage, and decreases the production of the hormone ghrelin, which helps regulate your food intake.

Fructose, on the other hand, is processed in the liver. When too much fructose enters the liver, and it can’t be processed fast enough for the body to use as sugar, it uses the fructose to produce fats that get sent into the bloodstream as triglycerides. As we’ll see, this produces a cascade of bad effects in the body. High blood triglycerides put us at risk for heart disease, but there’s a lot more to it than that. Another significant issue with fructose is that it can result in glycation at as much as 10 times the rate of glucose or sucrose.

KC Craichy
Author
The Super Health Diet


SuperHealth Challenge Tip!

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Posted on 20th January 2012 by admin in Health Alerts |Super Health

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Fruits and vegetables have relatively small amounts of fructose that most bodies can handle quite well. For example, a cup of chopped tomatoes has 2.5 grams of fructose, which is not a problem. However, due in part to corn subsidies in the United States, fructose has become an incredibly inexpensive and abundant form of sugar added to thousands of packaged food products and soft drinks we eat every day. Check the ingredients on packaged food labels and you’ll see the sources of fructose.

The problem is not the fructose itself—all fructose works the same in the body, whether it comes from apples, peaches, corn syrup, cane sugar, or beet sugar. The problem is that the volume of it in our diets has grown exponentially in recent decades. For example, a can of regular soda supplies 23 grams, and a super-size soda has about a whopping 62 grams. If we combine high quantities of fructose, such as these, with the fact that our bodies metabolize it in a different manner than glucose, it can damage our metabolism and is likely fueling the obesity crisis. And, not surprisingly, new research shows that it can increase our tendency to overeat.

KC Craichy
Author
The Super Health Diet


LivingFuel HealthAlert: The Truth About Corn

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Posted on 4th February 2010 by admin in Health Alerts

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Dear Living Fuel Family,

Fresh organic corn on the cob is delicious, but do you know how much corn your family is actually consuming?

Right on the heels of the terrific documentaries Food, Inc. and Fresh that we featured in previous HealthAlerts, comes the clever and insightful independent film King Corn. Follow two recent college graduates as they plant, grow and market an acre of our nation’s most adundant crop. Discover how corn and corn by-products dominate our food supply and why this information is of utmost importance to you and your family’s health.

Click here to watch a clip from the film.

For more information, visit our website, www.livingfuel.com, or call us at 1-866-580-FUEL (3835).

Here’s to your SuperHealth,

KC & Monica Craichy
Founder & CEO
Living Fuel, Inc.