SuperHealth Challenge Tip!

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Posted on 9th February 2012 by admin in Super Health

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Metabolism is regulated by the thyroid. The thyroid resets metabolism every few days in response to the amount of calories ingested. A slowed metabolic rate is like the car at a traffic stop that is sputtering to stay running. When one goes on a low calorie diet for several days without the right amount and proportion of essential nutrients, including protein, the thyroid will reset to “starvation mode” or a state of lower energy expenditure. The goal is to keep your metabolism running strong by optimizing nutrition even while on a low calorie diet and not signaling a metabolic slowdown.

Catabolic means to “break down” and is the opposite of anabolic, which means to “build up.” Simplified, catabolic is when blood levels of amino acids, sugar, and other nutrients have been depleted and the body has need for fuel or repair. The body then sends hormonal signals to release stored nutrients and to break down tissues to acquire any other needed raw materials. Catabolic hormones include cortisol, glucagon, adrenaline, and other catecholamines (“fight-or-flight” hormones released by the adrenal glands in response to stress). The body feeds off itself for raw materials if they are not otherwise available.

Metabolic adjustment and catabolism serve important functions within the body; however, it is critically important for them to be optimized. You want to maximize your resting metabolic rate and minimize catabolism. Catabolism of stored fat is very desirable, but loss of muscle and lean body mass is not.

Noralyn Mills, R.D., a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, states that when we feed our body at regular intervals, we send a signal to our body that it doesn’t have to store calories, but when we skip meals, we affect the metabolism negatively. “But,” she also specifies, “this can be accomplished with three regular meals a day for many of us.” The reality is that most people would be far better off skipping a meal than eating what they typically eat.

When looking at digestion speed of various foods and how the endocrine system works best, it would seem that eating three meals per day allows for normal digestion time and optimal endocrine function. Eating too often can cause digestive congestion and chronically higher blood sugar and insulin levels that can lead to diabetes, Syndrome X, and virtually every other disease you can name.

KC Craichy
Author
The Super Health Diet


SuperHealth Challenge Tip!

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Posted on 7th January 2012 by admin in Super Health

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One argument for eating five or six small meals a day is that when the body is deprived of food for a period of time, it will switch naturally to “starvation mode.” By eating every few hours, there’s no question that we signal our bodies to continue to burn calories. I have used the same “starvation” premise in this book as a warning against suddenly adopting a low calorie diet. It is true that in famine situations, when our bodies are given fewer calories, they will slow our metabolism to burn whatever fat stores we already have, thus protecting us for survival. That is a good thing.

However, here’s the problem regarding this argument for eating six meals a day. While it is true our bodies do respond to a prolonged fast by slowing our metabolism to conserve energy, the key word is “prolonged.” As Monica Reinagel, the Nutrition Diva, has stated: “Your body doesn’t go into starvation mode if you go four hours without food. In fact, it takes about three days of fasting or serious caloric restriction for your body to respond with any sort of metabolic adjustment.” In other words, three to six hours or even longer between meals is not going to kick your body into starvation mode.

There are really two issues that are generally being bundled into a single issue in people’s minds and referred to as metabolic rate. The two reasons most people believe eating more frequently is best are true metabolic rate and catabolism of lean body mass. Metabolic rate is basically how much energy—carbohydrates, fats, and proteins—your body is burning while at rest. Catabolism is how long the body can go without going into a catabolic state (breaking down lean body mass to be used as building blocks or fuel in the body).

KC Craichy
Author
The Super Health Diet


Staying Fit During Cold-Weather Workouts

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Posted on 3rd February 2010 by admin in Health Alerts

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Exercising in winter can be deceptive. Decisions regarding the regulation of metabolic rate and heat dissipation can be skewed because the body is already working hard to ward off the cold before the workout begins.

In a statement from the weight-loss support group TOPS Club, teacher, former body-building champion and physical fitness expert Amy Goldwater said skiing, skating, walking, snow shoeing and jogging can be beneficial and invigorating, but exercisers should consult with a doctor before starting a new fitness program.

Read more here.